Skip to main content

About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
in the silly analyses of what happened after quick contact states. clinton drastically lowered the capital gains tax and that was where most of the new revenues came. but in general, 50 nations around the world have reduced their tax rates since wealth and poverty was published. drastically reduce tax rates. most of eastern europe now has flat tax is. in all these countries, revenues have boomed. there hasn't been a big craze this is anime and estonia. this in a past and estonia with 12% flat tax. the fact is supply-side economics is booming around the world. it's only in the united states that soul-searching and from this economics of enterprise. >> what is your analysis of what is happening in what donald rumsfeld recalled old europe? >> old europe is fallen with the indulgent dilutions of the welfare state. they've all accepted dependence on a show i've government and bass have destroyed the value of their assets. when you destroy the value of your assets, ultimately the human beings who make your economy go our investments and creations of work after. when you'd appreciate this asset,
clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to really communicate with strategic effect. and i think you touched, steve, on a very important piece which was a seniority complex and if i can put it that way. china has felt that they were abused by major powers to the 19th century and well into the 20 century, and that has an interesting counterbalance, which is a seemed a bit of a superiority complex about the solutions that they are building on how china images as a global power. the disconten
chief of staff for president clinton -- "democrats must move on entitlements and a cliff deal. he said we're going to have to reduce the cost of entitlement programs. senator conrad, the chairman of the budget committee, said we need, we absolutely need to enact fundamental reform in our entitlement programs. he was warning that social security is -- quote -- "headed for insolvency" and senator durbin said ignoring entitlement reform is not a responsible approach. to be sure these programs last, and this is a good time to look at both revenue and spending and surely in a senate that works like the senate should work, we can find out how to do both of those things. my friend from wyoming just talked about the death tax, the estate tax. this is another area for all the reasons he mentioned that we need to look at doing something about this tax before it goes back to the taxable levels of ten years ago. there are two million family farms. our farms and ranches in the united states -- two million and 98% of them, almost 2 million, are owned by individuals, family partnerships and family co
obama made the statement about syria and chemical weapons again and secretary clinton did. we understand the red line. the world, this week, certainly growing concern about syria's potential use of chemical weapons. can we ask you your view on this. how concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? and should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential -- a potential response in a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the ouch suggestion advances in particular damascus and the regime, we very well consider the use of chemical well -- weapons. the whole world is watching. the world is watching very closely. and the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cops consequenceses -- consequences there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons. i'm not going speculate, comment on what the potential cons
now they will have the time to schedule a round of golf with bill clinton. [laughter] >> that's an inside joke, folks. >> let me turn to the subject at hand. i believe we're dealing with an important question in the south caucasus region which reps in a complex of the both regional alliances and conflicts, bitter rivalries, degrees of western orientation, desperate economic trajectories, and a potential venue for instability and even violence. in terms of you in the south caucasus region from the perspective of the subcommittee it is important to note some of our strongest instruments, the euro atlantic institutions of nader, the european union, have a weak presence, and, therefore, are not as relevant as they are in the balkans. ultimately this means that europe and the united states have less leverage in the region. this allows other countries in the region to compete or political, economic and military influence in the region. i'm looking for to hearing eyewitnesses discuss this issue today. really want to hear what you have to say. i believe that armenia, azerbaijan and ge
. secretary of state hillary clinton said today that the united states and russia to get syrian president al-assad to talk about the political transition and syria. she spoke yesterday with russia's for a minister and the u.n. peace envoy to the next conversation with u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford on president assad using chemical weapons. investor four was part of an event held by the foundation for defense of democracy is yesterday. this is about half an hour. >> the good morning. very nice to be here. let me thank andy for that very kind introduction and i would also like to thank john for inviting me here to talk to the foundation for the defense of democracy st. john and i go way back to when we were in iraq together. another tough situation where we were trying to help promote space change in the middle east. i am only going to talk for about ten minutes and then i would welcome some questions and a little more of a discussion. so just listening to me drone on. i want to take just one minute and give you my sense of the situation on the ground and syria, which is changing. and
who got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president. the republicans mainly were running congress when we had a like nafta, china's most favorite nation status, the jvc, the world trade organization. all these trade deals people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case, the jobs left.
problems. we firmly believe in this. i find it interesting that secretary clinton's last visit to the continent she expanded on that and said, yes, african solutions to african challenges but we need african solutions ss and participation in global challenges as well and that's a recognition of the evolving nature of things in africa. there are two documents that broadly guide what we do in africa, and those, i would commend -- probably most of you have probably read them. the first is the presidential policy directive for subsaharaan africa, and it is based on four pillars. the first, to promote opportunity and development. secondly. to spur economic growth, trade and investment. thirdly, to advance peace and security. and fourth, to strengthen democratic institutions. insurprisingly, we at u.s. a africa command focus on the third, building peace and security. but as a necessary precondition to achieving the other four objectives. so, again, i think it's best to think of us in, again, a supporting and enabling role. the second document that guide our principles as the defense
president bush, president clinton, second president bush, now president obama. none of those other presidents were treated in the way this president is treated. it's something senate democrats have never done in a lame duck session, whether after a presidential or midterm election. in fact, the senate democrats allowed votes on 20 of president george w. bush's judicial nominees, including three circuit court nominees in the lame duck session after the election in 2002. i remember i was the chairman of the judiciary committee. i moved forward on those votes, including one very controversial circuit court nominee. the senate proceeded to confirm judicial nominees in lame duck sessions after the elections in 2004 and 2006. actually, in 2006, we confirmed another circuit court nominee. we proceeded to confirm 19 judicial nominees in lame duck sessions after the election of 2010, including five circuit court nominees. the reason i'm not listing confirmations for the lame duck session at the end of 2008 is because that year we proceeded to confirm the last ten judicial nominees approved
making mali in the words of secretary clinton a powder keg of instability in the region and beyond. u.n. security council will likely vote in the coming weeks on a resolution authorizing military intervention of the african union and similarly african led interventions for example in cÓte d'ivoire and somalia that provided a model for multilateral and regionally led solution to allow the united states and their allies to provide operational support without putting boots on the ground. this intervention will take time and stability cannot be restored through it military action. the situation in mali is as much a crisis of governance as of security. the long-running grievances in the north and a political vacuum in the south must be addressed through diplomacy, rebuilding democratic institutions and the restoration of democratically-elected government. in addition any agreement that attempts to -- a client with aqim well require the government to do so. elections are the key to not only resolving and restoring now frozen u.s. bilateral assistance but also for reclaiming government co
's really not wrapped around that area. what has happened in part d and president rick clinton referred to this in his speech at the democratic convention is bringing the cost of the pharmaceuticals found. but is doing is similar to what was i was talking about ability to capitalistic competition. we did a joint venture a few years ago with wal-mart and we introduced a $50 a month drug plan. fifteen dollars a month. the industry thought we were crazy to do this. but what we did its worked with wal-mart's purchasing power, wal-mart's distribution capability and management and our ability to bring solutions to our members have broader product out. it has brought down the price of part d significantly in the industry. d.c. united came out $15 it is not doing with targeted pbs. what that's doing is spurring competition to the market place. you're right, maybe you can't take the anthem plan and humana plan by the time of purchase and users individually, but the thing about medicare advantage is you can walk the next year and your ability to walk from one planned to another plan motivates me
, and secretary clinton moves throughout the region as well as secretary panetta, and the amount of activities i do and my forces do is a prompt jump than what we did in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we are doing more of those things already, and that's viz l to the allies. i think it's visible to the partners, and i feel it visible to the region. we oftenment to jump to, well, where's the next aircraft carry your or the submarine. that's the signal. we will, over time, as you've heard secretary panetta say, rebalance towards the pacific, and i mentioned opening remarks. we're rapidly moving the most capable assets into the region because of the ballistic missile defense threats we face and those things, so it's about a holistic approach, and what i do on the military side is just one aspect of it. it's got to be tie into the economic side, what's happening in the diplomatic side, and so we're working hard that accomplishes this strategy. >> a quick question. you started to do or plan to do rotational b-52 deployments to northern australia. >> well, you've se
was not given to the surviving crewmembers, so 50 years later president clinton gave them their award. if you look at the ship and you think about it, the over 200 people in a of 35 feet wide and 200 feet long, it's pretty tight accommodations and if you look in the bunk room, you will see that there really aren't enough bunks for all the people. so you know, it was a tough situation, especially they would be out on the water for months at a time. they were smaller ships, so on the north atlantic, it could be a very difficult situation out there. i have some photographs that show the ships completely eyes encrusted and it would move around on the water. but they survived. after the war, some of them were scrapped, and some of them were given to other countries as part of president truman's, the truman doctrine which was to provide these vessels and other military boats to other countries. it was their number one vessel for a long, long time until about 1991 when the greek government decided they no longer needed the vessels. within a very short period of time, the destroyer escort raise nearl
that president was in cambodia right after the election. he was in burma. secretary clinton moved widely throughout the region as does secretary panetta. and the amount of activities that i do and my forces do have been a prompt jump in what we've done in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we're doing more of those things already. i think it's visible to our allies. i think it's visible to our partners. not to be invisible to the region. we also want to jump, where's the next summary our aircraft carrier, that's always the sake of. and we will, over time as you heard secretary panetta said, we will rebalance our navy towards the pacific, and i party mentioned in my opening remarks, we are rapidly moving our most capable assets in the region because of some of the ballistic missile defense will be facing of those types of things. so i think it's not about one thing. it's about a holistic approach, and what if you on the military side is only one aspect of a. it's got to be tied to what's happening in the economic side in what's happening in the diplomatic s
committee following a leadership of chairman clinton. we are in a tight schedule and 5 like to call up senator kc. i would be remiss if i did not recognize the presence here today of lieutenant-colonel larry lerlach. he was commander of an amphibious unit in lebanon. in october of 1983 hezbollah terrorists drove two trucks and exploded the american and french marine barracks. he survived it, 241 american women did not. he is here today with us. we thank you so much for your service and honoring us. [applause] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn
's done a great job as i think the clintons did, and raising two young girls. under very intense bubble, for himself personally but also the with gigabytes of his time. from what i've read he's never missed a parent teacher conference. if the president of the nfa of the net states and never misses a parent teacher conference, none of us should either. [inaudible] >> i've never said that. what i said is there is no parallel between fidel castro and barack obama or any american politician. fidel castro has never been elected to anything. never run for office. that's not anytime what i've ever said. i can tell you i don't parallel between places of government dominate the economy. but cuba goes well beyond the. cuba is not just about government dominate the economy. cuba is about getting beat up on the side of the churchhe has you dare to speak out against the government. that doesn't happen you. so i'm not anyway drawing parallels. [inaudible] >> i don't know if that's a way to put it. i think our future economic options have been diminished by some of the choices made by the president, b
in northern mali at our peril. in fact, secretary clinton has recently said that mali has now become a powder keg of potential instability in the region and beyond. the top american military commander in africa, general carter hamm, said publicly just this week that al qaeda's operating terrorist training camps in northern mali and providing arms, explosives and financing to other terrorist groups in the region. so i believe it's critical that the united states have a strong and comprehensive policy to deal with this threat. i'm concerned that the current u.s. approach may not be forward leaning enough to address all three crises -- security, political and humanitarian -- in a coordinated, comprehensive and effective way at the same time. given the compelling u.s. interest in stability and security and good governance in mali, we must ensure we don't miss the bigger picture of what this situation means for the future of mali, to our allies, and to our security. the u.n. security council is now considering what they call a concept of operations for an african-led military operation. the u.s. c
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17